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E-chop—Pioneer for Paperless

“Please have the company chop on the paper we received from the government and then send the original ones to us ASAP.” Are you familiar with above words in emails to some degree?

In China, the Government requires companies to have a “corporate seal” called Chops. Similar to the signature from an authorized representative in western countries, these corporate chops are the way to register official transactions, submit documentation, and validate paperwork in China. The body is where you bring more details about the subject or the problem. There’s a huge amount of paperwork required from the Chinese government, so company chops are typically used. However, to meet Chinese sustainable developmental regulations, the relevant department encourages a paperless environment. To adapt to this demand, the e-chop option becomes the ideal application. E-chop is the digital version of its physical counterpart and can be used with the same effectiveness as a paper Chop. E-chop is created by electronic seal technology which takes the place of the traditional physical seal.

While some people still use the traditional seals, the use of this electronic version is growing, and the full implementation and use is a matter of time. For instance, two-thirds of tax bureaus in Guangdong Province have adopted the e-chop system. More than 2 million documents are processed each year and the administrative costs saved equal about 5 million in RMB with an additional 35% increase in the comprehensive office efficiency. There are a variety of chops for different uses. While for some the process can be overwhelming and time-consuming, Incorp China can navigate it for you, reducing unnecessary interaction with Government offices.

Incorp China has provided expertise and personalized service for the past 30 years. Let us grow your business.

10 steps to authenticate your U.S. documents to be used in China

This might be something you have not given a whole lot of thought in the past. However, Chinese authentication of US documents is required with almost every application process you will encounter on the road of opening your own China business entity. Registration of an entity in China requires documentation preparation in the US and China. We will help you with documentation preparation in both the US and China saving you time and money. Having your American documents authenticated by the Chinese Consulate means they have passed the official screening to be used in China.

Failing to prepare your foreign documents may result in the delay or refusal of your applications. Here’s a guide on how you can complete this initial process in ten steps:

1. Identify documents

At first, you will need to select the documents that need legalization and clarify who is the legal representative/applicant for the company.

2. Notarization

There are some instances in which the US documents need to be notarized. In this case, we have a specialized legal services providers network to help you in completing this step easily.

3. Fill out document authentication form

Your legal representative/applicant (as defined in step one) now has to fill out and sign the Chinese application for document authentication. Because forms may vary, depending on in which state you want to apply for US document authentication, visit the respective state’s Chinese consulate website to find the correct form.

For the New York China consulate, e.g. you can find the document here: http://newyork.china-consulate.org/chn/fwzc/cgbg/P020171201186551196801.pdf

(Leave section 1 and 7 blank. Have legal representative/applicant sign twice in section 8 (top and bottom). We fill out section 7 and sign as the agent in section 8.)

4. Compile supporting documents

The next step is to obtain a copy of the following supporting documents:

  • The legal representative’s/applicant’s passport
  • Company’s certificate of existence and good standing
  • Articles of incorporation

5. Submit the documents

Submit the documents that need to be legalized by the State Department or Secretary of State to be certified. Some states require to authenticate the documents through the county’s clerk office before submitting them to the State Department or Secretary of State, so be sure to check.

6. Keep a record

Once the documents are certified by the State Department (and possibly the county clerk’s office) make a photocopy of them for your own records as well as the next step.

7. Submit the docs to the Consulate

Go to the Chinese consulate or embassy and submit the originals as well as the photocopies of the certified documents along with the application for the authentication and supporting documents.

8. Get a receipt

The consulate will issue a receipt with the total owed and the pick-up date for your documents.

9. Collect your authenticated documents

Return on the pick-up date with the receipt, pay the amount owed and process to then collect your authenticated documents.

10. Verify that all the documents have been authenticated

Once you’ve completed all the steps above, verify that all your documents have been authenticated. In case we have completed this process for you, we would then ship the authenticated documents back to you, our client, or wherever you want them shipped.

 

If you have any questions or would like to get a free consultation from us, simply email info@incorpchina.com or call +1 (561) 729 6508.

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How to save money and time through effective negotiations.

Without any discussion, money and time are the most valued resource for business. For western companies, traveling to china can be an investment due to the utilization of this two resources. Think about the costs of traveling, lodge, transportation, and the time spent on meetings or any process like registration and permits application. This case is about how one of our clients has saved through our effective negotiations.

Paperwork is expensive

In this case we are not talking about the fees involved to get paperwork filled out and submitted to register a WOFE. We are talking about the clients’ travelling expenses to personally sign the documents in order to get them approved.

Thinking outside the box

It just so happened that a US client of ours, a jewellery manufacturer, had to fly to China for business reasons unrelated to us. While his WOFE application was pending and his licenses were being processed, the company did not officially exist yet in China. However, Incorp China believes in seizing opportunities. Since the client was already on the ground we decided to visit a local bank branch who we frequently work with. Could we open up a bank account for the soon-to-be company  saving the jewellery manufacturer the fare for a second trip across the world?

Patience and persistence

Usually it is absolutely impossible (even as a local Chinese) to get a bank account opened without the corresponding business license. With our local Chinese staff and a lot of patience, networking and preparation we were able to convince them how detrimental it is to this business to sign the required legal documents for a bank account right away. The bank account would be pending the readiness of the business license and tax certificate and be officially opened once both the WOFE business license and the tax certificate were approved.

If your company needs to get a service done quick, we will give it our best to deliver – just because, against all odds, it sometimes actually works. In this case we saved our client a few thousand US Dollars and a lot of personal time.

Read more about how we solve problems opening up bank accounts for foreigners

Convinced? Then take advantage of a free consultation! Call us today: +1 (561) 729 6508

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Opening Up a Bank Account in China, credit card, Opening Up a Bank Account Under Tightened Restrictions - What You Need to Know

Opening Up a Bank Account Under Tightened Restrictions – What You Need to Know

Why opening a bank account in China is more difficult today

It is no secret that the recent crackdown on money laundering has left foreigners struggling to open a bank account in China. As a result, it has become even more beneficial for foreigners, seeking to move or extend their business to China, to consult an agent on the ground. The reason why there are so many China consultancies on the market is because it’ is quite challenging as well as time and labor intensive to get a company approved. Only a few of these China consultants are as committed as Incorp China, connecting with the government bureaus and banks, forming friendships, and therefore getting our clients the service they deserve.

Going beyond obvious

One of our most recent clients, a US software security company, had to open up a bank account after his company license had been approved. In order to do just that, our team went to one of the bigger China Construction Bank (CCB) branches located not too far from our office. Unfortunately, since banks had tightened their requirements over the past couple of months, our first request was denied. Why, is open for speculation.

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The China Construction Bank is one of the ‘big four’ banks in China – and one of the 10 largest banks in the world by revenue.

As Robert Fisch, Incorp China’s CEO did not want our client to have to fly back to China in order to give it another try at another bank, he went into the branch again with two members of his team. At the CCB branch, he found the employee who had refused our application, talked to her, and tried to find out why our client got refused and what we could do to fix it. When this did not work out, he managed to find the account manager.

The account manager, respectful and courteous as the Chinese treat their guests, offered us tea and his time in the staff kitchen. There, the Incorp China team and he talked, tea, took pictures and we each showed interest in each others’ jobs, cultures, and languages. After a while, the account manager promised to help us in every way he could, but that he would first need to get approval from the branch manager. She, luckily, was on site this day.

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The account manager was incredibly friendly and helpful and introduced us to the branch manager, who agreed to see us immediately. Again, the Incorp team were offered tea, we talked in the CCB branch manager’s office about this and that – starting with small talk but ending up talking about family, the beauty of China and how rapidly it has evolved in the past decades. The manager did not, however, clearly state how she was going to help us, despite being very friendly and enthusiastic about our visit. Nevertheless, she did make sure to let us know that she wanted to assist us in the process.

When we went to visit the branch a second time, the mood was slightly more dampened and the odds did not look like they were in our favor. Even a long meeting, talking about all the technicalities of the bank account opening procedure, did not change or clarify anything.

Unfortunately, for the following couple of days, there was honestly more confusion than progress. Nobody could really tell us what had gone wrong, what we needed to do to get the process going, or whether, in the end, they couldn’t do anything for us at all.

Therefore, our CEO headed back into the branch and had a meeting with all managers he could find on site together. After, yet again, some tea and chatter, the situation looked a lot better. We finally got a hint of what had gone wrong, and after ensuring the team at the bank branch that we would love to bring them more business, they understood that we were as serious about the legislations as they are. They agreed to restart the bank account opening process all over again – a clean slate – without the head of the client’s company having to travel to China again.

It’s all about client support

While this was time-consuming for our team, it got us connected with the CCB branch team near us, taught us yet another lesson about China’s bank requirements, and reminded us that with friendliness, patience, and a true passion for our field, every problem can be resolved. We are thankful for all of the China Construction Bank team’s time and effort and their dedication to their clients. Even more so we are proud to have resolved this issue for our clients and helped them to the best of our ability.

The trick to why all of these meetings with the managers of the bank’s branch where possible, and ultimately why they listened to us, was for Incorp China’s boss to speak Mandarin fluently. His China experience, consisting of well over 30 years and counting, gave us the insight into what is and what isn’t possible in such delicate situations, and, perhaps more importantly, displayed the legitimacy and seriousness of our business. It showed that Incorp China is helping both Western companies as much as the Chinese economy by bringing them here. We have been here for a long time and are intending to stay. This feeling of stability combined with our China knowledge has helped us more than once in negotiating a great deal for our clients.

Therefore, it is truly important and money well invested to have somebody on the ground in China who can provide this support to your business.

If you are currently looking into expanding or moving your business to China, let us do your paperwork for you so you can fully concentrate on your business. Call us for a free consultation today at +1 (561) 729 6508, or write us an email at info@incorpchina.com. We are looking forward to hearing from you.

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Why Employing China Consultants To Solve Banking Issues is a Must

Nationalities are a way of creating a sense of belonging. As soon as you are born, you are gifted one, sometimes two, nationalities. They play an important part in how you identify yourself throughout your life and they can come with – or prevent – great liberties. The problem with belonging to one nationality is that, as soon as you take a step beyond your mother land’s borders, you are a stranger. It is human nature to protect what we know and recognize and seek distance from what we see as foreign and unknown. Whether executed consciously or subconsciously, this behaviors is deeply engraved in our DNA.

It comes at no surprise, therefore, that institutions within one country make it their duty to protect their own citizens as best as possible from everything and everyone outside national territory. Foreigners are therefore naturally subjects to greater controls, restrictions and more tightly supervised legislations.

Coming to China will illustrate this point precisely. Being treated like this by banks and bureaus is neither meant intrinsically bad nor malicious, but can be very frustrating and drag out simple tasks seemingly forever.

One of our US clients, providing HR services for companies worldwide, was experiencing grave trouble with banks in Shanghai. While we cannot name the exact cause for this problem, it essentially prevented our client to pay their staff in multiple countries as a large part of their profit was stored in the Shanghai bank accounts. Incorp China had the entire team on their phones talking to banks in all time zones – Shanghai, Singapore, the United States and the United Kingdom – day and night. It was our goal not only to find a short term solution and get the client’s staff payed with whatever bank accounts were accessible, but even more importantly, smooth things over with the Shanghai branch and regain access to the client’s account. The issue was resolved, salaries were payed on time and the Shanghai account was reopened for transfers in and out of the country. Incorp China is continuing to look after this client’s staff all over China and helps the individual branches manage their HR payroll processes.

Contact us to find out how we can help you. With over 30 years experience in China, we have the knowledge and passion for the field to support you and your business.

Call for a free consultation today at +1 (561) 729 6508, or email us at info@incorpchina.com with any questions you might have. We are looking forward to hearing from you.

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