logistics

Category Archive logistics

business registration in china

The Transformational Trend: Why China is the place to be and how to start your business there

Why bring your business to China?

The future of China’s economy has never looked this bright. With a thriving middle class, a new wide-spread consumerist approach to spending, and increasing liberalization, China is now home to a wide variety of promising untapped markets.

Since the late 1980s and 1990s, China’s economy has been executing significant reform to the state-owned industry. Upon the passage of The Company Law in 1993, limited liability companies were approved, and firms were able to retain a share of their profits. As a result, private ownership increased rapidly. By 2005 it accounted for about 70% of China’s gross domestic product.

Among reforms, China established an unprecedented manufacturing presence as a result of highly competitive pricing and sheer production power. After dominating our global economy as the world’s largest exporter of goods since 2009, China’s focus now shifts from expansion to stability, that is back to service and consumption.

Amidst all this economic activity, China’s middle class has boomed. With a current urban population of around 800 million people, that is only going to grow, 54% percent are expected to be the upper-middle class by 2022.
Take a look:

China’s Middle Class as Percent of Urban Households, doing business in china

At this point, the economy’s growth has slowed. However, China is still ahead of their goal to double GDP between 2010 and 2020 and more industries are open to investment than ever before.
See below China’s GDP yearly growth since 2008 and China’s GDP annual growth rate over the last four years, respectively:

 

 

 

 

 

Even with a declining growth rate, China’s economy is still expanding at a rate three times higher than that of the US.

This is merely the start of China’s rebalancing. Economic prosperity is spreading as wages rise and workers demand better treatment. Furthermore, the quality of life is improving thanks to upgrades in transportation, health standards, and a wealth of technological advancements.

Increased opportunity and success is leading to higher disposable incomes and ideal target markets as the new Chinese consumer emerges, ready to spend. See below China’s consumer spending trend over the last ten years:

 

 

What is driving the Chinese consumer? Markets dealing with luxury items and services are bursting with opportunity and demand.

Interest continues to increase in:
• technological products
• luxury brands
• cosmetics
• nutritional care
• trendy foods
• high-quality goods
• entertainment
• travel

Get specific: See why Hong Kong is a great place to start

“The time is now. Be part of the process as China becomes tomorrow’s economic powerhouse.”
Ready to expand your business and break into China’s upcoming markets? Call now for a consultation with an IncorpChina team member, and establish your most important relationship in China success. +1 561 729 6508 | info@incorpchina.com
#chinesebusiness #chineseculture #whychina #chineseindustry #RO #JV #WOFE #chineseeconomy #GDP #thenewconsumer #culturaldifferences #chinesemarket #economictrends #AIC

hong kong, incorpchina

7 benefits from opening up a company in Hong Kong




Besides being a prestigious business address, Hong Kong has a variety of benefits to offer for those who are looking to or already own a company in China. Ranging from financial over legislative to cultural reasons. Below are your top 7 benefits from opening up a company in Hong Kong together with a WOFE in Mainland China.

 

  1. Tax benefits

While you are expecting to pay 25% income tax on your profits in China, with a Hong Kong company under your name you are able to send said funds across the border for a 5% transfer fee. This method can save you a considerable amount of money, especially considering that funds can be transferred between China and Hong Kong companies without currency controls. What that means is, when sending money from China abroad, usually, there are extremely high fees in place as well as a maximum amount of money that can leave the country per person or company per year.

Additionally, Hong Kong operates under a territorial tax regime. This means that there is a zero percent tax rate on money that is not earned in Hong Kong. Profits earned in Hong Kong are subject to a 16.5% tax. On the other hand, startups are eligible for VAT tax refunds. Either way, income tax in Hong Kong is significantly less than on the mainland. The exact tax break will always depend on the industry of your company as well as the location of your WOFE. In the QianHai zone in Shenzhen, for example, companies are given a particularly generous tax break.
To find out about this in more detail, contact Incorp China to get first-hand tax advise from local accounting and tax experts.

 

  1. Free economy and trade

Imports from abroad to Hong Kong are significantly easier to arrange and cheaper than transporting goods straight into Mainland China. Under CEPA, an agreement between Hong Kong and China with the aim to encourage trade, Hong Kong goods can even be imported into China under zero tariffs, as long as said goods and your company complies with CEPA rules. (http://www.hktdc.com/resources/MI/Article/cepa1/2009/06/274914/1244104141867_cepapdf.pdf) If you are planning on regularly moving cargo across Chinese borders, Incorp China would strongly advise talking to us about setting up an entity in Hong Kong.

 

  1. Intellectual property

Other than in Mainland China, Hong Kong takes into consideration the prior use of intellectual property when filing for trademarks, patents, copyrights, etc. China, on the other hand, operates under the first-to-file principle. If you are interested in finding out about the Chinese trademark system in more detail, please read more about it here.

 

  1. Familiar and regulated legal system

Whether tax law, intellectual property registration and enforcement, an open economy or the general bureaucratic processes, Hong Kong offers a much more Western mindset when it comes to legal systems and business culture. Familiar documents, consistent bureaucratic procedures and English speaking government officials can offer a smoother entrance into the Asian business world, not just for inexperienced businessmen. Bureaucratic processes can furthermore be executed more rapidly in Hong Kong than they would in China. For example, changing the structure of your company by reallocating shares would take about two months in China, whereas such an action would only require about a week in Hong Kong.

 

  1. Hong Kong as an international node

The proximity to the mainland and its open, capitalist mindset make Hong Kong the perfect connecting point between East and West. Strong economic ties with the ASEAN countries as well as a trustworthy environment for Western investors make Hong Kong a fertile ground for businesses from all around the world. The combined understanding of both the Western and Eastern business and cultural mentality will prove to be beneficial in more ways than you would expect.

 

  1. Relatively hassle-free setup

…especially if you are turning to Incorp China to help you out! We are offering a free initial consultation to help you figure out how to open up a company stress-free.

Hong Kong companies take less time to open in comparison to Chinese enterprises. More importantly, government institutions are considerably more straightforward and consistent regarding their requirements for opening an entity. In Mainland China, rules and regulations can change unexpectedly and abruptly, making it absolutely essential to have a team on the ground that is tirelessly checking up on your application and actively pushing it forward. On top of legislative changes, in China, it is common that institutions like banks or government bureaus will change their mind unexpectedly about a signature or document they require on top of what you were instructed to provide. Don’t let this discourage you as this is a commonly observed phenomenon, especially towards foreigners.

 

  1. Simplified China WOFE setup

Opening a Hong Kong entity makes applying for a Chinese WOFE significantly easier. Hong Kong incorporation documents are filed in English as well as Chinese which speeds up the process of incorporating a company on the Mainland.

 

  1. Limited liability

Setting up a limited liability company (LLC) in Hong Kong can protect you from lawsuits even in Mainland China. Since each shareholder of an LLC can only be held accountable for the capital they have invested and the Hong Kong company is liable for the registered capital in Mainland China, in case of a lawsuit, your personal capital outside of your business would be protected.

 

 

No doubt, a Hong Kong company can be highly beneficial to those planning to open up a company in China and even those who already own one. Nevertheless, if you are unsure or would like to talk to us about your specific situation. Don’t hesitate to contact us by calling us (+1 (561) 729 6508) or sending us an email (info@incorpchina.com).

chinese manufacturing,China, Asia, company, manufacturing, conquer, master, manage, organization, production, product, cargo, manufacturing, factory, quality, control, barrier, entry, work, entity, client, delivery, order, customer, timely, quick, on time

How to Conquer Chinese Manufacturing

 

 

Western companies face every day the struggles of having a split operation between Head Quarters and a Chinese manufacturing division. Complying with due dates, design specifications, proper storage, and shipping can become a nightmare. Obvious questions just rise when dealing with those situations.  How do you guarantee quality and oversee the process cheaper than by hiring even more staff? How to effectively communicate with the production team? How to save the operation without sacrificing the budget?

Through many years, Incorp China had helped clients to overcome this struggle and here are the three main challenges you need to overcome when trying to conquer Chinese manufacturing.

Communication

Naturally, the factory order changed several times before the final product was agreed upon. In order to get everybody on the same page and organized instead of confused, make sure every detail is translated correctly and in a timely manner. Correct translation doesn’t guarantee accurate engineering though and you need to be sure those instructions are executed properly. Let’s say you’re a flower pots manufacturer. You need your product to be produced according to specific design-details and stored in a specific way and conditions to preserve the integrity of your product. Communicating these instructions during the production process is crucial.

Logistics

A strong plan for logistics is key to success. You need to think about every detail affecting your production and how you can come over with an alternative plan. This particular plan needs to be designed with a wide perspective over your SWAOT’s analysis. Does the location of your production site a key factor in delivery? Are there potential threads due to climate conditions over the year that can affect both the production and delivery? Do you have alternative resources to deal with last-minute struggles? As we can see, logistic is one of the biggest challenges to face and can ruin your operation if you don’t plan it properly.

Paperwork

This is the most underestimated task and this is precisely the reason why is a challenge and it’s also related to logistic. You need to know which clearance and documents you need to have for transport and freight but also need to have a scope on how long you’ll be ready with it. Some products have a live period and getting stuck in your warehouse can end in huge losses for your business. Also, paperwork and documentation can delay your delivery affecting contracts and damage your reputation. As you can see, an eye for detail is indispensable. Risking paperwork not being compliant with China customs is not an option.

Letting us assist you with your business in China means you don’t have to look for multiple contractors to help you with aspects like factory quality control and help with logistics. With Incorp China you get full service in one stop.

Intrigued? Call us or send us an email: +1 (561) 729 6508 / info@incorpchina.com

Tags, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

support, airport, China, WOFE, open a business in China, china business support, china business consulting

Why You Need a Flexible Support System in China

The problem

We always look to  provide the best support to our clients, but due its size, China can be an overwhelming country , so we understand when our clients are hindered to come directly to our office in Shenzhen. Just recently, one of our clients, a paper products manufacturer, was looking into moving part of his manufacturing process to the South West region of China. Since the team of three was on a strict time schedule they were not able to come to Shenzhen personally in order to meet with Incorp China’s team to discuss the bureaucracy behind such a move.

The solution

Therefore, Incorp’s CEO, Robert Fisch and two of his team members took a train, planning to meet the client in the city close to where they were looking at potential factories looking to provide an appropriate support. Since it is hard to stick to a specific time schedule with factory visits, the Incorp team needed to come to the airport to catch the client shortly before they would fly back to the US. Thankfully, everything worked out and the US clients had over an hour to discuss the procedures behind setting up an entity in China with Incorp China. A Wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise (WOFE) would allow the client to invoice other Chinese factories, in the local currency, Renminbi.

The benefits

Taking such a long trip simply to meet a potential client might seem like an odd allocation of company resources. Incorp China, however, has built its success on establishing personal relationships and providing the quality service and support our clients deserve. Going the extra mile for our clients shows that we truly care and are prepared to help, no matter the obstacles.

The lesson

Incorp China is about much more than just serving clients. We want to be a long term partner and support system to all our clients and bridge the gap between the Eastern and Western business world. Flexibility plays a huge factor in that, especially since China can be unpredictable in terms of its rules, regulations, and conditions for foreign enterprises. We have the experience and are prepared to deal with these challenges. Incorp China will assist you no matter where you are from, where in China you want to operate and how big or small your mission might be.

Contact us!

Are currently looking into expanding or moving your business to China? Let us do your paper work for you – so you can fully concentrate on your business. Call us for a free consultation today at +1 (561) 729 6508, or write us an email at info@incorpchina.com. We are looking forward to hearing from you.

 

Want to know how Incorp China help saving an oil platform? Click HERE to read the story.

Tags, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

guanxi,offshore, oil, platforms, oil company, drilling, multinational, corporation, business, China, Incorp China,

In China, Guanxi Can Open Many Doors – And Borders

Some life lessons are best conveyed through a story. This one is about never underestimating what power an extensive guanxi holds in China.
Guanxi is the mandarin term for the network, the connection people form privately and in business relation to one another over a long period of time. Other than in Western cultures, China doesn’t differentiate between personal and professional relationships. Upholding one’s ‘face’, one’s reputation, making new connections and maintaining them becomes an omnipresent necessity.
There hasn’t been a single client for whom we didn’t need to make good use of our extensive guanxi network.
offshore, oil, platforms, oil company, drilling, multinational, corporation, business, China, Incorp China,

Offshore oil platforms. Photo: Chad Teer

One particularly interesting case was a logistics project for a multinational oil company we worked on a few years back. Construction parts had to be delivered to an off shore oil platform over night or else the 400 employees working on the platform would have had to be evacuated via helicopter. Six government officials ranging from police over inspection to immigration officers would have to be convinced to keep the border open long past their regular hours to ship the cargo across – and we had only one day to do exactly that.
The negotiations started at the Hong Kong airport with the customs director. He needed to agree to wave the goods through customs clearance prioritizing it to other shipments. While in the Western business world a simple call from an insider might be the correct approach, our CEO personally sat down with the customs director for tea. Slowly guiding the conversation from personal exchange to business affairs our CEO’s excellent knowledge of the Cantonese language helped form common ground and resulted in a successful endeavor.
With the cargo out of the airport ahead of time the next hurdle were the borders. What proved to be problematic were the border’s operating hours between Hong Kong and China preventing the construction parts to be passed through before the deadline. Keeping open a border beyond scheduled times requires, firstly, the border officials of both countries to be in agreement and, secondly, a trail of legal documents permitting such an inconvenience. In wise foresight, Mr. Fisch, our CEO, had already payed the Chinese border commander a visit on his way to Hong Kong. Usually, these types of high-ranking officials would never accept the visit of a foreigner. Mr. Fisch, however, instead of attempting to make an appointment, walked through the government building as if he belonged there, straight into the commander’s office. He immediately started conversing in Mandarin. Stunned by an American speaking fluent Chinese and being this straightforward, the officer invited our CEO to enjoy tea together.
After, again, a very private conversation about their backgrounds, families and commonalities guanxi was established and one could move on to business affairs. The Chinese border commander helped Incorp China not only to acquire the approval of the police, customs and immigration but even agreed to organize a chopper waiting nearby the border to transport the cargo directly from behind the Chinese frontier to the company’s offshore platform.
guanxi,shenzhen, border, bridge, hong kong, china, transfer, visa, entry, FongTin, border control, bridge, gates, officials, police

Shenzhen FongTin to Hong Kong Bridge. Photo: WiNG

On the Hong Kong side of the border the Hong Kong border commander who made a grand entrance with his two bodyguards greeted our CEO. The initial encounter was rather tense but after tea, good conversation and Mr. Fisch’s ‘renqingwei’ (English interpretation: “human touch/flavor”) he managed to get through to the officer. Since the Hong Kong border commander was seemingly nervous about granting such a great exception, Mr. Fisch called the Chinese border commander to speak to him personally over the phone. With reassuring words the two officers came to an agreement.

It was an achievement comparable to a miracle. Never before had the border been left open without the time consuming effort of preparing the legal documents required. The vital construction parts passed customs, inspection, and the boarder without problems and were delivered on time for the platform to undergo repairs. Our client was able to keep his business in operation and none of the employees had to be evacuated. With no representatives on Chinese ground who could have personally convinced Chinese officials in their native languages to help this company, huge financial losses couldn’t have been prevented. Establishing and maintaining a strong guanxi is vital and simply cannot be done form afar or by someone not in touch with Chinese customs and manners.

Tags, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,